Sunday 18 June

While working on Cardboard Hill Bevendean in the blazing sun this morning with Friends of Bevendean Down there were many Meadow Browns and Marbled Whites and Ringlets and 3 Dark Green Fritillaries all far to active for pictures. (Geoff Stevens http://bevendeandown.wordpress.com)

Nymans Woods. Went with the plan to spot my first White Admiral and Silver-washed Fritillary of the year. In the morning Spotted two White Admirals on the bridge by the lake and in the afternoon two SWF's in the middle ride in Nightingale wood on the other side of the road from the gardens. (Martin Buck)

Walked up the bostal and over to Ashcombe Bottom this afternoon. There were some battered old blues in the field. Marbled White, Small Blue, Meadow Brown, Small Heath on the chalk grassland. In the woods a couple or three White Admirals and about the same of silver washed fritillaries also Comma, Red Admiral, Large Skipper and at least four Brimstone. A Comma was seeing off a silver washed fritillary which made for a good orange coloured tussle in the bright dappled sunshine. Saw what looked like a hairy spider but it was the young clinging to its back that made it look furry.
I heard that Neil H got 32 Purple Emperors at Knepp today. Good work. (Tim Squire)

Having read about Southwater woods complex in Matthew Oates' excellent book "In pursuit of Butterflies" last winter, I have been meaning to go there. After reading Chris Corrigan's post yesterday, I decided that today was the day.We went relatively early to escape the heat (for those reading this page in the future the temperature was about 27C at its highest today). I had missed White Admirals from my list for the past two years, so I was delighted when Southwater delivered White Admirals in spades. We must have seen more than a dozen. Marlpost was slightly better than Madgeland. At one tree we saw four or five males duelling. Everywhere we went in the woods we say Silver-washed Frittilaries bombing up and down the rides.

The English language has over two hundred thousand words but not one that accurately expresses the relief one feels when having checked a thousand Meadow Browns you find the one that is in fact your first Ringlet of the yearyou were looking for. From that moment of course you can't stop seeing Ringlets.

Knowing that tomorrow will be spent in the office and unwilling to give up such a lovely day, in the early evening I set off on a tour of Truleigh Hill, Anchor Bottom and Mill Hill. On Truleigh Hill I saw my first Small Skipper of the day as well as a few Small Tortoiseshells, Red Admirals, Large Skippers and of course Meadow Browns. Anchor Bottom offered little except a view that never tires. On Mill Hill there were quite a few Marbled Whites and one Common Blue. The most numerous species seems to be the Small Heath at the moment. (Jonathan Crawford)

Two male Silver-studded Blues seen (50m apart) on the second (lower) path below Smugglers Car Park. (Steve Wheatley)

Lancing Ring and Steep Down. Having identified all three orange June Skippers yesterday, I had to give up today except to say 9 Large Skipper, 2 Small Skipper with 34 unidentified as they were literally in perpetual motion. 100+ Meadow Brown, 27 Small Tortoiseshell, 20 Ringlet, 28 Marbled White, 8 Common Blue, 7 Red Admiral, 5 Holly Blue, 22 Small Heath, 5 Comma, Small Copper, Small White. Later, on the footpath to the west of Applesham Farm (Lancing) a few sightings of White-letter Hairstreak in the elm canopy and one within touching distance nectaring on bramble. (Lindsay Morris)

Another boiling hot afternoon so I caught the train to Littlehampton. Seven species of butterfly on the edge of the golf course but alas no white letter hairstreaks! c5 meadow obrowns, 1 green veined white, 1 Large Skipper, 1 Holly Blue, 1 Speckled Wood 1-2 Red Admirals and a lovely Comma. Hot afternoons clearly not the best hairstreak time! (Chris Corrigan)

While bird-watching at Woods Mill this morning with the Crawley and Horsham RSPB group we saw many Meadow Browns, several Ringlets, at least 10 Marbled Whites, several Small and Large Skippers and 3 Silver-washed Fritillaries. (Andrew Guest)

Along the "What is Life but full of care" trail at Wakehurst this morning I was pleased to spot one Gatekeeper among the many Meadow Browns. (Andrew Guest)

2 Silver Studded Blues beside the ride approx 150m SW of Smugglers car park. 1 male and 1 female. (Chris Hooker)

Mary, one of my son's (Ed) and I had a wander in the Southwater Woods. We had about 20 Silver-washed Fritillaries (including two mating pairs) and about 5 White Admiral. Also a few Ringlet and just one Large Skipper. At home, in Storrington) I spotted a single Ringlet by the back hedge and then very conveniently for me it perched in the meadow. I have all the "first dates" for the past eight seasons and this is 13 days earlier than the previous earliest date of July 1st. (martin kalaher)

Yesterday my Mill Hill transect gave the following: Adonis Blue 3, Common Blue, Marbled White 20, Meadow Brown 11, Small Heath 13, moths: Cinnabar (Tyria jacobaeae) 3, Straw-barred Pearl (Pyrausta despicata), Yellow Shell (Camptogramma bilineata), Garden Grass-veneer (Chrysoteuchia culmella), Little Roller (Ancylis comptana). Afterwards at Wood Mill I spotted a female Large Fruit-tree Tortrix (Archips podana). (Colin Knight)

On Friday night we had a large number of moth species round our balcony light at Littlehampton: Garden Carpet (Xanthorhoe fluctuate), Double-striped Pug, (Gymnoscelis rufifasciata), Double-striped Tabby (Orthopygia glaucinalis), Flame Shoulder (Ochropleura plecta), Light Arches (Apamea lithoxylaea), Riband Wave (Idaea aversata), White-faced Twist (Pandemis cinnamomeana). (Colin Knight http://www.colinknightimages.com/Nature-Photography-UK/Moths)

A fresh Purple Hairstreak perched in side view on my shirt sleeve when I was in Roundwick Copse (SU9929), Plaistow, West Sussex on Tuesday 13th June, this seemed a early date for me because whenever I have seen this species' before, starting in 1965 it has always been in July. (Stephen R Miles)

One Purple Emperor (male) seen mid day on Sussex / Surrey border (Wendy Novelle)
Hopefully in the Sussex side! (Ed jnr)