Butterfly Conservation
saving butterflies, moths and our environment
Butterfly Conservation - saving butterflies, moths and our environment
easyfundraising.org.uk

Please remember, you can raise money for your favourite Butterfly Conservation Branch every time you shop online simply by clicking on the easyfundraising.org.uk logo first and selecting:
"Butterfly Conservation - Sussex Branch".

2019 Last sightings

Updated 1st October

Adonis Blue
22 September

Black hairstreak
1 July

Brimstone
Still flying

Brown Argus
4 October
Still flying

Brown Hairstreak
21 September

Camberwell Beauty
2 August

Chalk Hill Blue
23 September

Clouded Yellow
Still flying

Comma
Still flying

Common Blue
Still flying

Dark Green Fritillary
15 August

Dingy Skipper
9 August

Duke of Burgundy
3 June

Essex Skipper
3 August

Gatekeeper
30 August

Grayling
19 August

Green Hairstreak
28 June

Green-veined White
Still flying

Grizzled Skipper
21 June

Holly Blue
28 September

Large Skipper
20 August

Large Tortoiseshell
2 May

Large White
Still flying

Long-tailed Blue
Still flying

Marbled White
7 August

Meadow Brown
2 October
Still flying?

Orange-tip
10 June

Painted Lady
Still flying

Peacock
Still flying

Pearl-bordered Fritillary
24 May

Purple Emperor
6 August

Purple Hairstreak
14 August

Red Admiral
Still flying

Ringlet
20 August

Silver-spotted Skipper
27 August

Silver-studded Blue
17 July

Silver-washed Fritillary
29 August

Small Blue
13 August

Small Copper
01 October
Still flying?

Small Heath
24 September

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary
22 August

Small Skipper
27 August

Small Tortoiseshell
13 September
Still flying?

Small White
Still flying

Speckled Wood
Still flying

Swallowtail
27 July

Wall Brown
Still flying

White Admiral
21 September

White-letter Hairstreak
4 August

Wood White
23 July

2019 First sightings

0 Species to date
* indicates a national first

Queen of Spain Fritilliary
15 August

Long Tailed Blue
5 August

Swallowtail
27 July

Grayling
17 July

Brown Hairstreak
14 July

Silver-spotted Skipper*
13 July

Chalk Hill Blue
30 June

Purple Emperor
26 Jun

Essex Skipper
25 June

Gatekeeper*
17 June

Small Skipper
11 June

Dark Green Fritillary
09 June

Marbled White
09 June

Silver-studded Blue
09 June

White-letter Hairstreak*
08 June

Ringlet
06 June

Silver-washed Fritillary*
05 June

Purple Hairstreak
04 June

White Admiral*
2 June

Meadow Brown
28 May

Large Skipper
27 May

Black Hairstreak*
21 May

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary
16 May

Wood White
12 May

Large Tortoiseshell
02 May

Adonis Blue
02 May

Small Blue
01 May

Brown Argus
29 April

Common Blue
28 April

Duke of Burgundy
23 April

Pearl-bordered Fritillary
20 April

Small Heath
17 April

Dingy Skipper*
11 April

Wall Brown
07 April

Small Copper
30 March

Green Hairstreak
30 March

Grizzled Skipper*
30 March

Clouded Yellow
29 March

Orange-tip
25 March

Green-veined White
24 March

Large White
07 March

Painted Lady
25 Feb

Speckled Wood
24 Feb

Camberwell Beauty
23 Feb

Small White*
23 Feb

Comma
15 February

Small Tortoiseshell
15 Feb

Holly Blue
14 February

Brimstone
09 January

Red Admiral*
01 January

Peacock*
01 January

Search

Send in your sightings

Recent sightings in Sussex


Monday 21 October

Over the weekend of 19th and 20th I was at Lancing where some Painted Lady larvae were still to be found (1x3rd instar, 2x4th instar and 2x5th instar) on Common Mallow, Tree Mallow and Burdock in sheltered locations. An adult was also seen flying eastwards along the beach on 19th. If the weather holds, the first adults from these could start emerging in early November. There were also six Red Admirals egg laying on nettles growing in the shelter of south-facing walls. On Sunday 20th the wind direction changed from a south-westerly to a northerly and I was surprised to see two Red Admirals coming in off the sea, despite having a headwind, and there were several more on the beach. I now see that this ties in with sightings made the same day at Newhaven and Seven Sisters which reported the same behaviour. Other observations were of two Ruby Tiger larvae on the same nettles the Red Admirals were using and four Large White larvae still feeding on Sea-kale. I will do a detailed check for pupae in November. (Vince Massimo)

Yesterday (20 October) I paid another visit to the Knepp Wildland, primarily to enjoy the deer rut. The Reds have now finished their business for the year and are no longer charging around or bellowing, but the Fallow are still going strong. There is plenty to see for those interested in fungi, including rarities associated with the ancient oaks in the Middle Block. Although common, I found a particularly nice example of Beefsteak Fungus. Butterfly interest was restricted to a single Red Admiral, which was busy laying eggs on nettles growing along the base of a south-facing hedgerow. I've also seen a few Peacock and Comma here in recent days. (Neil Hulme)